can i feed my dog raw beef liver

Additionally, cooked beef liver can also be tough and difficult to digest. By contrast, raw beef liver is soft and easy to chew, making it ideal for dogs. Plus, since it’s already in its most natural state, raw beef liver contains all of the nutrients your dog needs for optimal health.

Lets take a look at some of the reasons why you might want to make beef liver for dogs a part of their diet.

You often hear about how good beef liver is as a protein source for humans, but what about your best friend? Does beef liver for dogs make a good pet food? After all, it is an organ meat, and you might naturally wonder if it’s okay for your dog to eat it.

As it turns out, beef liver is a good dog food, and it is something that has a lot of health benefits for your pup. Let’s take a look at some of the reasons why you might want to make it part of your dog’s diet.

How Much Can Your Dog Have in A Day?

Like everything in life, moderation is key to feeding beef liver to your dog. It’s recommended that you start by giving the liver as a nutrient supplement, especially if your dog isn’t used to eating it.

can i feed my dog raw beef liver

Beef liver is rich in nutrients which can upset your dog’s tummy or lead to loose stools if you feed them much at first. Therefore, gradually ease your furry friend into it.

For a medium-sized dog, that’s around 1 ounce of beef liver per day max. A small breed dog would only require about a 1/5 of an ounce per day, while a large dog can have 2 to 2.5 ounces per day.

Is Raw Beef Liver Good For Dogs?

Yes. Raw beef liver for dogs provides all the nutritional benefits that may be lost in cooking. However, the digestive system of dogs has evolved quite a bit since domestication.

Cooked liver is tastier and also safer for your pet, as the cooking process kills bacteria. At Spot and Tango, we ensure every nutritional benefit is preserved, so your dog doesn’t miss much from raw liver.

Is Eating Liver Helpful for Your Dog’s Liver?

This is a principle that has been lauded for thousands of years by natural medicine practitioners like those who practice Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine. In fact, it also happens to be true. Eating liver will help to fortify your dog’s liver.

This is likely a general health benefit derived from the numerous essential nutrients found in liver, particularly high-quality liver like human-grade beef liver. But, as you can see, the benefits don’t stop with the liver. It’s good for all of your dog’s tissues!

Additionally, cooked beef liver can also be tough and difficult to digest. By contrast, raw beef liver is soft and easy to chew, making it ideal for dogs. Plus, since it’s already in its most natural state, raw beef liver contains all of the nutrients your dog needs for optimal health.

FAQ

How much raw beef liver can I feed my dog?

With 10 to 100 times the nutrients of muscle meat, liver is a great source of “good stuff” for your pet. Packed with vitamin A, B vitamins, iron, trace minerals, protein and more. *Warning ~ Don’t give more then 1 oz. per 50lb dog per day and if you are feeding a pre-mix with liver in it already feed even less.

Is raw or cooked liver better for dogs?

Raw liver is not as safe for dogs, so be sure to cook the food first. Raw meat may contain parasites, so the safest way to feed your dog this food is by boiling or steaming it. Avoid sautéeing the liver—oils and seasonings may upset your dog’s stomach.

How do I prepare beef liver for my dog?

Pop it in a pot of boiling water and simmer for about 15 minutes until tender, pan-fry it over low-medium heat, or place it on a baking sheet and cook in the oven for 15-20 minutes at 375 degrees. When preparing liver for your dog, avoid adding butter, oil, salt or any other spices.

Is raw beef liver OK?

Like all raw meat, liver can have salmonella, E. coli or Campylobacter bacteria that cause serious digestive infections. “Eating undercooked or raw meat, including beef liver, increases your risk for potentially life-threatening foodborne illnesses,” she warns.

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