can u get salmonella from beef

Salmonella can be found in a variety of foods, including chicken, beef, pork, eggs, fruits, vegetables, and even processed foods. Some people are more likely to get an infection and serious illness. You can take steps to prevent infection, such as following the clean, separate, cook, and chill guidelines.

State and federal officials are investigating a new outbreak of Salmonella infections related to ground beef.

So far the Illinois Department of Health has identified 26 confirmed cases. A source of ground beef has not yet been found. Illness onset dates range from April 25 to May 18, but additional patients are expected to be identified because it can take more than four weeks for confirmation testing and reporting to be concluded.

In addition to the Illinois patients, there are patients in other states, but the Illinois officials did not report what states are involved.

The Illinois health officials report that some of the ill people have said they ate undercooked ground beef before becoming ill.

As of this afternoon, June 7, neither the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nor the USDA Foos Safety and Inspection Service have released any information about the outbreak.

In Illinois, patients are reported in Chicago as well as Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake, McHenry, and Will counties.

There is concern that consumers may have unused portions of the implicated ground beef in their homes. Therefore the Illinois Department of Health is reminding people to thoroughly cook ground beef to a temperature of 160 degrees F, as measured by a meat thermometer. Visually inspecting the color of ground beef or its juices is not a reliable way to determine that it has been cooked to a sufficient temperature to destroy Salmonella.

About Salmonella infections Food contaminated with Salmonella bacteria does not usually look, smell, or taste spoiled. Anyone can become sick with a Salmonella infection. Infants, children, seniors, and people with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness because their immune systems are fragile, according to the CDC.

Anyone who has eaten any ground beef and developed symptoms of Salmonella infection should seek medical attention. Sick people should tell their doctors about the possible exposure to Salmonella bacteria because special tests are necessary to diagnose salmonellosis. Salmonella infection symptoms can mimic other illnesses, frequently leading to misdiagnosis.

Symptoms of Salmonella infection can include diarrhea, abdominal cramps, and fever within 12 to 72 hours after eating contaminated food. Otherwise, healthy adults are usually sick for four to seven days. In some cases, however, diarrhea may be so severe that patients require hospitalization.

Older adults, children, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems, such as cancer patients, are more likely to develop severe illness and serious, sometimes life-threatening conditions.

Some people get infected without getting sick or showing any symptoms. However, they may still spread the infections to others.

So far the Illinois Department of Health has identified 26 confirmed cases. A source of ground beef has not yet been found. Illness onset dates range from April 25 to May 18, but additional patients are expected to be identified because it can take more than four weeks for confirmation testing and reporting to be concluded.

The Illinois health officials report that some of the ill people have said they ate undercooked ground beef before becoming ill.

Older adults, children, pregnant women, and people with weakened immune systems, such as cancer patients, are more likely to develop severe illness and serious, sometimes life-threatening conditions.

In Illinois, patients are reported in Chicago as well as Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake, McHenry, and Will counties.

Anyone who has eaten any ground beef and developed symptoms of Salmonella infection should seek medical attention. Sick people should tell their doctors about the possible exposure to Salmonella bacteria because special tests are necessary to diagnose salmonellosis. Salmonella infection symptoms can mimic other illnesses, frequently leading to misdiagnosis.

CDC is assessing interventions that target each of these points along the farm to fork continuum. Currently, CDC is working to explore the roles of policies related to preharvest interventions; to promote the adoption of effective interventions during slaughter and processing; to conduct formative evaluations to understand consumers’ knowledge, awareness, perceptions, and attitudes concerning irradiation as a tool to improve the safety of ground beef; and to assess who becomes sick in ground beef outbreaks and their individual and community-level risk factors to better inform communication and education materials and prevention strategies.

Large E. coli O157 outbreaks in the early 1990s linked to undercooked ground beef drove numerous changes to the food safety system. These changes reduced E. coli O157 contamination of ground beef and reduced the number of E. coli O157 outbreaks from ground beef. In contrast, Salmonella outbreaks associated with ground beef have not decreased in recent years, and since 2016, several large outbreaks resulted in nearly as many illnesses and more hospitalizations than all the Salmonella outbreaks linked to ground beef during the previous 36 years. A recent analysis found that from 2012 to 2019, 27 Salmonella outbreaks were linked to beef consumption. These outbreaks highlight several ongoing concerns, including the emergence of a multidrug-resistant strain of Salmonella Newport and the role of dairy cows in contamination of ground beef. Much like E. coli O157 30 years ago, ground beef contaminated with Salmonella now causes a substantial burden of illness, and additional efforts to prevent these outbreaks are needed. Reducing outbreaks and illnesses of Salmonella from ground beef involves interventions at the farm level (“preharvest”), at slaughter and processing, and in home and restaurant kitchens.

Salmonella can be found in a variety of foods, including chicken, beef, pork, eggs, fruits, vegetables, and even processed foods. Some people are more likely to get an infection and serious illness. You can take steps to prevent infection, such as following the clean, separate, cook, and chill guidelines.

FAQ

How common is Salmonella in beef?

Results. During 2012–2019, 27 Salmonella outbreaks were linked to beef consumption, resulting in 1103 illnesses, 254 hospitalizations, and two deaths (Table 1). A median of four outbreaks (range: 1–5), 91 illnesses (range: 9–488), and 16 hospitalizations (range: 1–132) were linked to beef each year.

Why does beef not have Salmonella?

Salmonella can be found deep inside the raw chicken. Beef of the other hand does not naturally contain salmonella. The only bacteria that grows on beef is where oxygen can be found which is the outside. The outside of the beef needs to be heated to over 65*c to kill the bacteria that has cultured.

Can you get Salmonella from touching raw beef?

Take care handling raw meat and meat products Especially if the meat is undercooked or not handled properly. This is because germs like Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Yersinia can live on it. These can spread to different foods if you’re not careful.

Is Salmonella in beef 2023?

As of August 23, 2023, a total of 18 people have been infected in a multistate outbreak of Salmonella illnesses linked to ground beef: (Multistate Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Ground Beef| CDC). Illnesses started on dates ranging from April 27, 2023, through June 16, 2023.

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