can you get real wagyu beef in america

American wagyu is raised, slaughtered and sold within the U.S., but the cattle may be descended from authentic Japanese cattle. More commonly, however, American wagyu is the result of crossbreeding, typically between Japanese Black cattle and American Angus or Holstein (pictured below).

Highly prized by beef connoisseurs in the United States and around the world, Wagyu beef carries a legacy of providing a flavor unlike that of any other beef due to its exceptional marbling and elevated raising practices.

But, with that legacy and the larger variety of Wagyu products available today comes a lot of mystery: Are Wagyu cattle really fed beer? How do you know whether the beef you’re trying is Wagyu?

We’ve put together some of the most common misconceptions about Wagyu beef so you can have the knowledge you need when you’re choosing Wagyu.

Go With Trusted Vendors

Trust is the name of the game when dealing in A5 Wagyu, as is the case with caviar and other luxury ingredients.

If you buy online, which we recommend, spend plenty of time researching vendors and clarifying all relevant details. Nothing should be left to assumption or ambiguity, especially on the internet.

How to Buy A5 Wagyu in the US

When it comes time to buy A5 Wagyu in the US, it’s not so simple as strolling to your local butcher and pointing at slabs of meat in a glass case.

Here’s how you should go about procuring A5 Wagyu and how to handle it every step of the way.

Is A5 Wagyu Available in the US?

After that crash-course in Wagyu beef and rating, let’s get to the bottom of our original question: is it possible to find real, certified A5 Wagyu in the United States, or do you need to book a flight to Tokyo to get the real thing?

While Wagyu in Japan is held to extremely high standards with no room for funny business, things get a little cloudy when we start looking at markets in the United States.

If you were born and raised in the US, you’ll know that marketing can sometimes be misleading, products may not live up to the hype, and regulations are looser in terms of terminology and labeling.

A perfect example is caviar, a term that is technically reserved for lightly salted sturgeon roe but gets thrown around to describe roe from salmon, trout, bowfin, and others.

That’s why you’ve got to be super vigilant when shopping for Wagyu in the US, especially if you’re after the finest, most highly-graded products on the planet, A5.

With that in mind, obtaining A5 Wagyu in the United States is absolutely possible, so long as you know the lay of the land and follow a few guidelines that we will soon map out for you.

Keep in mind first that A5 Wagyu has only been recently made available on a larger scale to US markets. Not long ago, it was reserved for only the finest Michelin Star restaurants and no one else.

Also, remember that knowledge is power when it comes to buying Wagyu beef, authentic sturgeon caviar, or any other luxury food items.

Learning as much as possible about the product and vendor will save you countless hours, lots of cash, and ensure you have a smooth, pleasant experience overall.

American wagyu is raised, slaughtered and sold within the U.S., but the cattle may be descended from authentic Japanese cattle. More commonly, however, American wagyu is the result of crossbreeding, typically between Japanese Black cattle and American Angus or Holstein (pictured below).

FAQ

Can you get 100 Wagyu beef in America?

Fareway Meat Market is proud to sell Feddersen 100% Fullblood Wagyu beef, born and raised in Iowa with lineage directly back to Japan. Feddersen Fullblood Wagyu Beef reaches a quality the USDA beef grading scale simply does not touch.

What is the American version of Wagyu beef?

American Wagyu beef is the result of crossbreeding traditional beef cattle with purebred Wagyu. The result is a perfect blend of famous Wagyu buttery marbling and the robust beef flavor that American beef is known for. It is the best of both worlds.

Is American Wagyu as good as Japanese Wagyu?

American Wagyu is commonly utilized for grilling, roasting, and pan searing. The fat content is typically lower than Japanese Wagyu due to less marbling and this creates a hearty, beefy flavor many find very palatable when included in well-known dishes.

Can Wagyu cows live in America?

According to the American Wagyu Association, there are roughly 40,000 Wagyu-influenced cows in America today, with less than 5,000 being considered 100% purebred or “full-blood” as the term goes.

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