do not eat packet in beef jerky

You may have seen silica packets in everything from beef jerky to the new shoes you bought. While silica gel is usually nontoxic if ingested, some people have choked on it. For this reason, manufacturers label them “Do not eat.” If a loved one is choking on silica gel, call 911 and seek emergency medical attention.

If you’ve opened up a packet of beef jerky recently, you may have noticed a tiny plastic pouch mixed in with the meat. If you pick it up, you may notice a sort of brittle texture, as though it contains sand. Unless you have prior experience in food production, you may be wondering, “What is the packet inside beef jerky?” Read along to learn what that thing is and what it’s doing in your meat. The answer may surprise you.

The packet inside beef jerky is actually an “oxygen-absorber.” These absorbers contain iron powder, a chemical that reacts with the oxygen in the package and causes the iron powder to rust. Once the iron powder has oxidized and fully rusted, the absorber is “loaded,” and the absorption stops. If you remove the absorber from the package, the reaction ends, and it will start again once you put it back in.

Oxygen absorbers are included with beef jerky to prevent microorganisms from growing inside the package. Aerobic bacteria cannot live in an atmosphere without oxygen, which are the conditions the oxygen absorbers essentially create. So, if someone asks you, “What is the packet inside beef jerky?”, you can simply tell them it’s a pouch that limits the risk of beef jerky rotting by minimizing the amount of oxygen in the bag.

Some companies and individuals prefer to vacuum-package their meats. Another popular method for safely storing jerky for long periods, vacuum packaging is a process by which all the oxygen is sucked out of the package. This creates roughly the same outcome for jerky. However, when an item is vacuum sealed, it’s pressed tightly into the plastic. Because this creates a strange presentation for beef jerky, most manufacturers prefer to use oxygen absorbers.

At Lee’s Market Jerky, we make sure to safely protect all our meats. You can check out our delicious products at our online jerky store.

At Lee’s Market Jerky, we make sure to safely protect all our meats. You can check out our delicious products at our online jerky store.

Oxygen absorbers are included with beef jerky to prevent microorganisms from growing inside the package. Aerobic bacteria cannot live in an atmosphere without oxygen, which are the conditions the oxygen absorbers essentially create. So, if someone asks you, “What is the packet inside beef jerky?”, you can simply tell them it’s a pouch that limits the risk of beef jerky rotting by minimizing the amount of oxygen in the bag.

If you’ve opened up a packet of beef jerky recently, you may have noticed a tiny plastic pouch mixed in with the meat. If you pick it up, you may notice a sort of brittle texture, as though it contains sand. Unless you have prior experience in food production, you may be wondering, “What is the packet inside beef jerky?” Read along to learn what that thing is and what it’s doing in your meat. The answer may surprise you.

Some companies and individuals prefer to vacuum-package their meats. Another popular method for safely storing jerky for long periods, vacuum packaging is a process by which all the oxygen is sucked out of the package. This creates roughly the same outcome for jerky. However, when an item is vacuum sealed, it’s pressed tightly into the plastic. Because this creates a strange presentation for beef jerky, most manufacturers prefer to use oxygen absorbers.

The packet inside beef jerky is actually an “oxygen-absorber.” These absorbers contain iron powder, a chemical that reacts with the oxygen in the package and causes the iron powder to rust. Once the iron powder has oxidized and fully rusted, the absorber is “loaded,” and the absorption stops. If you remove the absorber from the package, the reaction ends, and it will start again once you put it back in.

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If you regularly eat beef jerky, you’ve undoubtedly noticed a little white packet in the package. Those packets, usually labeled “DO NOT EAT,” probably seem out of place next to your delicious snack. You may have wondered whether they’re dangerous or poisonous.

Those sinister-seeming packets actually show up in a lot of places — in Amazon orders, food containers and more. All sorts of industries rely on them to perform a simple function — keeping moisture away from products.

What Happens if You Eat the Packet in Beef Jerky?

If curiosity gets the better of you (please don’t let it) or you accidentally eat silica gel, watch for symptoms like stomach ache, vomiting, nausea and constipation.

If you vomit repeatedly or can’t hold down food, seek immediate medical attention.

If the packet contains pink or blue silica gel beads, there’s a much higher risk of danger. These silica gel beads are treated in cobalt chloride, which is toxic when eaten.

Manufacturers should never package beef jerky or any food product with silica gel packets containing pink or blue beads, so please be vigilant, and don’t eat beef jerky that’s packaged incorrectly.

You may have seen silica packets in everything from beef jerky to the new shoes you bought. While silica gel is usually nontoxic if ingested, some people have choked on it. For this reason, manufacturers label them “Do not eat.” If a loved one is choking on silica gel, call 911 and seek emergency medical attention.

FAQ

What happens when you eat the do not eat packet in beef jerky?

Branded with warnings like “DO NOT EAT,” and “THROW AWAY,” silica gel makes it super clear to consumers that this is NOT an additional flavour packet for your food product. These dire warnings suggest that the contents are deadly poisonous. But what really happens when you eat silica gel? The short answer is nothing.

What happens if silica gel is consumed?

Silica gel is non-toxic but it is a choking hazard for young children. However, in some rare instances, manufacturers coat silica gel in cobalt chloride, a toxic compound. Eating cobalt chloride-coated silica gel will likely cause nausea and vomiting.

What happens if a dog eats the do not eat packet in beef jerky?

The good news is that silica gel is non-toxic. However, if your pet eats the permeable plastic packet that contains the beads it can cause vomiting or get stuck in the digestive tract. For more answers to common pet poison-related questions, visit ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center.

What is the oxygen absorber packet in beef jerky?

Oxygen absorbers are included with beef jerky to prevent microorganisms from growing inside the package. Aerobic bacteria cannot live in an atmosphere without oxygen, which are the conditions the oxygen absorbers essentially create.

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