what cut for beef jerky

Top round and bottom round are lean, flavorful and – in our opinion – the best cuts of beef for jerky. Sirloin tip is extremely lean, but not as tender, and a bit more expensive. Flank steak is also lean (though you may need to trim some fat) and flavorful, but can be tough if its sliced with the grain.

Do you want to know what part of the cow is beef jerky? Although many different cow parts are used to make beef jerky, some may be considered better than others. Rest assured that we use the best cuts of beef for our products.

If you are concerned about quality products, you can order jerky online with us to get the best quality beef jerky for great prices! If you want to know more about what part of the cow is best for beef jerky, keep reading this short guide.

Are There Other Cuts Used in Beef Jerky?

You may have wanted to know what part of the cow is used for beef jerky – and so far you have learned about the 6 most common parts of the cow used. But are they the only parts used?

Although there are six main types of beef cuts used, they are not the only ones people use in beef jerky production. Many cuts can be used for jerky. Besides the ones we already mentioned, you can also get jerky from chuck roast, brisket, tenderloin, and ground meat.

By using different parts of the cow, you can create different flavor profiles. This allows variety in flavors, tastes, and consistency of the meat. For instance, sometimes a meat with more marbling will be a moister beef jerky than a traditional part of the cow (like top round).

What are the Key Considerations Jerky Brands Make When Choosing Their Cuts?

Now that you know more about what part of the cow is beef jerky – the answer being many different parts – you may have other questions. For instance, what are the key considerations in making beef jerky? While each meat cut has pros and cons, how do you choose the one right for you? There are two primary considerations that jerky-makers typically have in mind when selecting cuts.

The affordability of individual beef cuts is an important factor when making jerky. Buying jerky made from different cuts of meat is similar to purchasing different types of meat for anything. Cost can be a huge factor as different cuts could have significantly different costs.

The leanness of the meat and the taste of that cut is the other consideration. Although price is important, how lean the meat is and how the final product tastes are often the most important deciding factors for many people. At least, that’s the case for us at Mahogany Smoked Meats!

Many enjoy lean, inexpensive cuts like top and bottom round for jerky. However, sometimes the cost is not the most important factor. For some people, taste is their number one consideration and they are willing to pay more for a superior-tasting product. For instance, many people prefer their jerky made out of cuts of meat that make steaks such as plank steak, sirloin, or NY Strip.

Other Great Meat Options for Beef Jerky

One of the best parts of making beef jerky at home is the flexibility and creativity that goes into the process. While our top seven recommendations are a great place to start, there’s no reason why you can’t test other cuts.

Here are a few additional cuts of meat that are worth exploring.

Brisket – Famous for Texas-style BBQ, brisket is a rich, fatty, and delicious cut of beef. The challenge of making brisket jerky is finding a cut that is sufficiently lean.

Skirt Steak – Skirt steak is a long, flat piece of meat that is known more for its flavor, than texture. The fat content on skirt steak can run a little high which makes it a challenge to make into beef jerky. Not a deal-breaker, but less than ideal.

Tri Tip – With strong roots in the Californian BBQ scene, this cut was originally called the California cut. Trip Tip has excellent intramuscular marbling and can be very tender when made into jerky. It’s worth exploring if you come across it in your local store.

Flap Meat – Flap meat comes from the muscle near the bottom sirloin. It is thin, fibrous and chewy, but does have lots of flavor. It is often confused with skirt and hanger steak. It can work for jerky, but the heavy intramuscular marbling which doesn’t fully dry.

Top round and bottom round are lean, flavorful and – in our opinion – the best cuts of beef for jerky. Sirloin tip is extremely lean, but not as tender, and a bit more expensive. Flank steak is also lean (though you may need to trim some fat) and flavorful, but can be tough if its sliced with the grain.

FAQ

What’s the best cut of beef for jerky?

The best meat for jerky are Top Round, Bottom Round, Lifter and Pectoral, but a variety of cuts can be used such as Flank Steak and Skirt Steak. These cuts of beef check all the boxes for beef jerky—economical, lean, and full of flavor.

How thin should I slice meat for jerky?

Consistent thickness is the name of the game when it comes to jerky slicing. Slicing your jerky evenly will ensure that each piece cooks and dries at the same rate. This prevents over-drying and under-drying. We recommend slicing meat for jerky at a thickness between 1/8″ and 1/4″ with the perfect thickness at 3/16”.

Can you make beef jerky out of chuck roast?

Chuck: Located near the top shoulder, it is a common choice for boneless roasts and steaks. You can cube it and use it for beef jerky. You may have to grind it because of its high-fat content. Additionally, you may have to invest a lot of time trimming down the excess fat; otherwise, it will have a short shelf-life.

Is it cheaper to make your own beef jerky?

Making your own beef jerky at home is not only incredibly simple, but it is also much much cheaper than buying store-bought jerky. Plus, you’ll be able to control all the ingredients that go into making it; no weird stabilizers or unpronounceable additives.

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