where did beef stroganoff come from

For some time I have been under the erroneous assumption that beef stroganoff is a Hungarian dish. Must be the paprika and sour cream. The fact is, beef stroganoff originated in Russia with nary a dash of paprika. It was originally flavoured with mustard.

I learned this culinary fact in September when I visited Russia for the first time, specifically the city of St. Petersburg, where the Stroganov family lived in opulent comfort. Their home — a grand pink palace near the centre of the city — is now a museum and nearby restaurants proudly serve their namesake dish of beef, mushrooms and sour cream.

How did it come to be? The story of beef stroganoff is a mix of fact and fancy. A popular legend says the dish was created by a French chef in the employ of the Stroganov family. As the story goes, Count Stroganov had such poor teeth he could no longer eat steak. A dish of tender bits of beef in a creamy sauce fit the bill. At least that’s what the tourists are told.

At the time, Russian aristocracy loved everything French so it’s easy to imagine the richest family in Russia had a French chef. That part rings true. As such, the original recipe for beef stroganoff was a marriage of French cuisine (seasoning with mustard) and Russian tastes (a good dollop of sour cream). The recipe was first published in a popular Russian cookbook in 1871 and soon became a favourite in home kitchens and restaurants. With the communist revolution of 1917 and the civil war that followed, many aristocratic Russian families fled their country for China, taking the recipe for beef stroganoff with them. Whereas in Russia beef stroganoff was (and still is) traditionally served with potatoes, in China it was served with noodles or rice. Eventually, Russian émigrés made their way to America, bringing their taste for beef stroganoff with them. The rest, as they say, is history.

The original recipe did not include paprika or mushrooms, but both are a popular variation on the theme, as is the practice of serving beef stroganoff over egg noodles. Nor is beef the required meat. I made a delicious version of beef stroganoff using beaver, the meat provided by friends who trap. If you would like to make beaver stroganoff, heed this advice: trim the meat of visible fat, boil for 20 minutes in plenty of water, remove and cool, then proceed with the recipe. Honestly, you’ll hardly know it isn’t beef.

I’ve included a picture (at top) of beef stroganoff served in a restaurant just a few blocks from the Stroganov Palace in St. Petersburg. On mashed potatoes, of course.

History edit

The dish is named after one of the members of the influential Stroganov family.[2][3][4][5] A legend attributes its invention to French chefs working for the family,[6] but several researchers point out that the recipe is a refined version of older Russian dishes.[3][4] In Russian the dish is called Бефстро́ганов from the French Bœuf Stroganoff.[7] Recipe from

In 1891, the French chef Charles Brière, who was working in Saint Petersburg, submitted a recipe for beef Stroganoff to a competition sponsored by the French magazine LArt culinaire.[4] This led Larousse Gastronomique to assume that he was the inventor of this dish, but both the recipe and the name existed before then. Sautéing of beef Stroganoff

Another recipe, this one from 1909, adds onions and tomato sauce, and serves it with crisp potato straws, which are considered the traditional side dish for beef Stroganoff in Russia.[8][9] The version given in the 1938 Larousse Gastronomique includes beef strips, and onions, with either mustard or tomato paste optional.

In 1960s United States, several manufacturers introduced dehydrated beef stroganoff mixes, which were mixed with cooked beef and sour cream.[12][13] It was also available freeze-dried for campers.[14]

Around the world edit

Beef Stroganoff preparation varies significantly not only based on geography, but based on other factors as well, such as the cut of meat and seasonings selected. Meat for the dish can be cut in different ways and is sometimes diced, cubed, or cut into strips. Some variations include mushrooms and onions or other vegetables and varied seasonings such as sugar, salt, black pepper, and bottled marinades (especially Worcestershire sauce) and rubs.[15] Beef Stroganoff with pasta

In the version often prepared in the United States today in restaurants and hotels, it consists of strips of beef filet with a mushroom, onion, and sour cream sauce, and is served over rice or noodles.[16] Today, the dish is generally served over wide or twisted egg noodles in the United States. British pubs usually serve a version of the dish with a creamy white wine sauce, whereas more “authentic” versions are often red stews with a scoop of sour cream separately served on top.[citation needed] Beef Stroganoff cooked with paprika and served with rice

Larousse Gastronomique lists Stroganoff as a cream, paprika, veal stock and white wine recipe. The Brazilian variant includes diced beef or strips of beef (usually filet mignon) with tomato sauce, onions, mushrooms and heavy cream. Brazilians also prepare Stroganoff with chicken or even shrimp instead of beef. It is commonly served with a side of shoe-string potatoes and white rice. In Portuguese it is called Strogonoff or Estrogonofe.

Stroganoff is also popular in Nordic countries. In Sweden, a common variant is korv Stroganoff [sv] (lit. sausage Stroganoff), which uses the local falukorv sausage as a substitute for the beef. In Finland, the dish is called makkara-stroganoff, makkara meaning any kind of sausage. Beef Stroganoff is, however, also a common dish. Diced brined pickles are also a normal ingredient in Finnish Stroganoff.

Stroganoffs popularity extends to Japan, where it is most commonly served with white rice, or white rice seasoned with parsley and butter. Its popularity increased dramatically with the introduction of “instant sauce cubes” from S&B Foods. These are cubes with dried seasoning and thickening agents that can be added to water, onion, beef, and mushrooms to make a Stroganoff-style sauce. Additionally, Japanese home recipes for Stroganoff frequently call for ingredients that are outside of Russian tradition, such as small amounts of soy sauce.[citation needed]

At the time, Russian aristocracy loved everything French so it’s easy to imagine the richest family in Russia had a French chef. That part rings true. As such, the original recipe for beef stroganoff was a marriage of French cuisine (seasoning with mustard) and Russian tastes (a good dollop of sour cream). The recipe was first published in a popular Russian cookbook in 1871 and soon became a favourite in home kitchens and restaurants. With the communist revolution of 1917 and the civil war that followed, many aristocratic Russian families fled their country for China, taking the recipe for beef stroganoff with them. Whereas in Russia beef stroganoff was (and still is) traditionally served with potatoes, in China it was served with noodles or rice. Eventually, Russian émigrés made their way to America, bringing their taste for beef stroganoff with them. The rest, as they say, is history.

I learned this culinary fact in September when I visited Russia for the first time, specifically the city of St. Petersburg, where the Stroganov family lived in opulent comfort. Their home — a grand pink palace near the centre of the city — is now a museum and nearby restaurants proudly serve their namesake dish of beef, mushrooms and sour cream.

For some time I have been under the erroneous assumption that beef stroganoff is a Hungarian dish. Must be the paprika and sour cream. The fact is, beef stroganoff originated in Russia with nary a dash of paprika. It was originally flavoured with mustard.

The original recipe did not include paprika or mushrooms, but both are a popular variation on the theme, as is the practice of serving beef stroganoff over egg noodles. Nor is beef the required meat. I made a delicious version of beef stroganoff using beaver, the meat provided by friends who trap. If you would like to make beaver stroganoff, heed this advice: trim the meat of visible fat, boil for 20 minutes in plenty of water, remove and cool, then proceed with the recipe. Honestly, you’ll hardly know it isn’t beef.

How did it come to be? The story of beef stroganoff is a mix of fact and fancy. A popular legend says the dish was created by a French chef in the employ of the Stroganov family. As the story goes, Count Stroganov had such poor teeth he could no longer eat steak. A dish of tender bits of beef in a creamy sauce fit the bill. At least that’s what the tourists are told.

From its origins in mid-19th-century Russia, it has become popular around the world, with considerable variation from the original recipe. Mushrooms are common

FAQ

Where was beef stroganoff invented?

From its origins in mid-19th-century Russia, it has become popular around the world, with considerable variation from the original recipe.

Is stroganoff Russian or Hungarian?

Prairie Palate: Many think it’s a Hungarian dish but it actually originated in Russia. For some time I have been under the erroneous assumption that beef stroganoff is a Hungarian dish. Must be the paprika and sour cream. The fact is, beef stroganoff originated in Russia with nary a dash of paprika.

Why do Russians eat beef stroganoff?

The dish is named after the Stroganov family, a wealthy Russian family in the 19th century, who were known for their love of beef dishes. Beef Stroganoff has been a part of Russian cuisine for many years and is often served at special occasions and events.

What is the difference between Brazilian stroganoff and Russian stroganoff?

Brazilian Beef Stroganoff vs Russian Stroganoff Brazilian beef stroganoff is similar, but it replaces the mustard with tomato paste, ketchup, and worcestershire sauce. The tomato paste gives the dish a signature light orange hue.

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