can you make corned beef with chuck roast

Traditionally, corned beef is made with a brisket cut but we decided to experiment with our chuck roast and luckily, it worked out great. We are going to share the steps on how to prepare a traditional corned beef and then how to apply that recipe to a corned beef breakfast hash and a classic reuben sandwich.

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I’m a huge fan of corned beef. I love it with cabbage, in a Reuben, slathered in cream cheese and wrapped around a pickle… Anyway, you get the idea – I love corned beef! As much as I love it, I had not ever made it myself. I had complained about the price of it at the store, but never had the gumption to brine corned beef myself. That is until one fateful reader survey.

In said reader survey, I received more that one response asking, “How can I brine my own corned beef?”

I was embarrassed to admit that I didn’t know because I’d never done it – hadn’t ever even considered brining my own. But my interest was piqued, and I wanted to be able to have the answer (and tutorial) to that question at the ready if and when it came up again. So, without further ado here’s what you need to know to brine corned beef in the comfort of your own kitchen.

The first time I brined my own corned beef, I brined a brisket. That’s what I think of when I think corned beef because that’s what you see in the stores come the end of February through March 17th. But after the whole process was done, I got to thinking that other cuts might work just as good if not better and be more cost effective than the ol’brisket. And it turns out, I wasn’t wrong.

According to Ace VanDeWalle, owner of Ord Locker and old college friend of mine, whom I consulted with for this post…

“Brisket was primarily used because it’s a tough cut and brining is a good way to use it and make it tender. Inside round or top round is also used in a lot of places that slice it for sandwiches, it’s going to be quite a bit leaner. As for other cuts, a good ol chuck roast would also work.”

I have since turned a top round roast into corned beef. And if I’m being honest (which I always am), I like it better than the corned beef I brined from brisket.

Just thought Id share a cooking discovery: while brisket is traditional, it works pretty well to make corned beef using a chuck roast. I was concerned that the thick shape would keep the cure from getting into the center, but I didnt have that problem on a blocky shaped 4 1/2 pound roast. I use a recipe that has a little less curing and regular salt, but soaks for 10 days, so there was time for it to reach the center. It is/was delicious, and idk about you, but for me, buying a chuck on sale is much cheaper and easier than finding reasonably priced brisket. Last time I used a brisket, I found the point end to be waayyy too fatty, so it became stew meat and chunks of fat to make tallow, and I only had the flat anyway. Just putting it out there, since with food prices going up, brisket has gotten ridiculous in my area, but chuck has not (Where I am brisket is almost $10/lb, chuck goes on sale with a digital coupon for $3.50/lb). We had excellent corned beef hash yesterday morning, and are having reubens for lunch today. It was so easy that Im about to corn another one 🙂 Archived post. New comments cannot be posted and votes cannot be cast. Locked post. New comments cannot be posted.

I have since turned a top round roast into corned beef. And if I’m being honest (which I always am), I like it better than the corned beef I brined from brisket.

The first time I brined my own corned beef, I brined a brisket. That’s what I think of when I think corned beef because that’s what you see in the stores come the end of February through March 17th. But after the whole process was done, I got to thinking that other cuts might work just as good if not better and be more cost effective than the ol’brisket. And it turns out, I wasn’t wrong.

In said reader survey, I received more that one response asking, “How can I brine my own corned beef?”

Some of these links are affiliate links and some of them aren’t. Affiliate links help me keep FFB up and running. For all the deets on affiliate links, please visit the Terms & Conditions page.

According to Ace VanDeWalle, owner of Ord Locker and old college friend of mine, whom I consulted with for this post…

Traditionally, corned beef is made with a brisket cut but we decided to experiment with our chuck roast and luckily, it worked out great. We are going to share the steps on how to prepare a traditional corned beef and then how to apply that recipe to a corned beef breakfast hash and a classic reuben sandwich.

FAQ

What cuts of beef can be used for corned beef?

Beef brisket is the cut used to make corned beef. A primal cut, it’s a large piece from the breast or lower chest of beef cattle. Brisket is a tough cut with connective tissue throughout, and a whole brisket typically weighs 10 pounds or more.

What is the best cooking method for corned beef?

The most common method for cooking corned beef and cabbage is boiling. Put the meat in a large pot, cover it with water or beef broth, add a seasoning packet and boil before lowering the heat to a simmer. Cook for 2 to 3 hours or until the meat is tender and cooked to your liking.

Which is more tender brisket or chuck roast?

There’s a reason why chuck is so popular in beef stew! Cube up your meat—cutting it into smaller chunks breaks up that connective tissue—and make a crock pot dinner. Remember, though, that since brisket is a tougher cut of meat, it’ll need an even longer cooking time than chuck roast. Your patience will pay off.

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