how long to cook roast beef at 180 degrees

Our go-to for simplicity is a good sear to caramelise the outside, and oven cooking at 180 degrees. 20 minutes per 450 g, plus 20 minutes. This keeps it quite rare, add five or ten minutes per section if you wanted medium-rare or medium. Our fail-safe way to test the cook on the roast is using a meat thermometer.

When it comes to cooking roast beef, in my opinion, you shouldn’t be using a “calculator” – there really isn’t a formula. Therefore, I wouldn’t put a definite time slot per weight per oven temp.

As per my last blog, what I advise is never to cook your roast beef on a high heat meaning short time in the oven. In other words, don’t rush it. Roasting at a low temperature yields you a superior result with:

With all this in mind estimated roasting time for a 1.5 -2kg cut, after a good blast of heat (to brown the exterior) will need 1.5 – 2 hours of cooking at approximately 120 degrees C to achieve a med -rare result (55 – 65 degrees C).

HERE IS THE EXCEPTION: A tender cut where the distance between the exterior and the centre of the meat is very small. An example of this is the tenderloin or, otherwise known as the eye fillet. This cut should be placed in the oven on a very high heat (180 – 200 degrees C) for a short period of time to reduce meat shrinkage. The idea is to achieve a well – browned flavoured exterior and a rare to med – rare tender interior. The tenderloin is extremely thin and tender so this kind of roasting is perfect for this cut.

Roasting time for this cut: First sear the meat on the stove top then place it in the oven at 180 -200 degrees C for approximately 10 – 15 minutes to achieve a med – rare result.

How to test that you have achieved your desired temperature range in the meat (in this case med – rare @ 55 -65 degrees C?

I know that this is a very bold statement. Red meat is expensive as we prefer certainty with weight and cooking time. However the truth is two cuts at the same weight, with different distances between the exterior part of the meat and the centre will require different cooking times. As a general rule, the larger the distance between the exterior of the meat and the centre the lower the heat – therefore the longer it takes to cook. This method achieves a restaurant – quality result.

The secret of roasting red beef and veal is very simple

Cooking time does not affect the color of the meat. It is only the temperature that counts. This in combination with the fact that the longer it roasts the more tender it will become. So you should roast at as low a temperature as you have the time for, and make sure that the internal temperature of the meat never gets above 60°C (140°F). Then it will be perfect every time.

This means that you can actually get the best red meat by cooking it at a little below 60°C (140°F) for many hours. Even up to 48 hours. Unfortunately, it will become gray if it reaches just 62 degrees. So it is probably a risky tactic to cook it right at the edge of the temperature :-s There are not many home ovens that are accurate enough.

The portions of a roast beef that becomes gray, are the ones that has been heated to over 62°C (143.5°F) degrees. Luckily there is an easy way to avoid that.

Roasting at a low to medium temperature

The next best practice is to roast between 80°C (176°F) and 120°C (250°F) for an appropriate amount of time. This is the method I typically use when I roast red meat. You can also vary the temperature according to when the meat should be done.

I usually start with the oven at 80°C (176°F) and then see how it goes. If it seems like it will not be finished in time, I turn up the temperature to 100°C (212°F). I can also be found to, once in a while, to turn it all the way up to 120°C (248°F). But never any more than that. I will rather let the guest wait for the meat to finish then 😉

If you want the meat to reach 60°C (140°F), and you start with the meat at room temperature, 20°C (68°F), and you want it to take 4 hours, then you can figure out that the meats temperature should rise by 1°C (2°F) every 5-6 minute, Or 10°C (18°F) per hour. Then you can simply check the temperature after the first hour and see if the temperature has to be turned up or down.

HERE IS THE EXCEPTION: A tender cut where the distance between the exterior and the centre of the meat is very small. An example of this is the tenderloin or, otherwise known as the eye fillet. This cut should be placed in the oven on a very high heat (180 – 200 degrees C) for a short period of time to reduce meat shrinkage. The idea is to achieve a well – browned flavoured exterior and a rare to med – rare tender interior. The tenderloin is extremely thin and tender so this kind of roasting is perfect for this cut.

As per my last blog, what I advise is never to cook your roast beef on a high heat meaning short time in the oven. In other words, don’t rush it. Roasting at a low temperature yields you a superior result with:

I know that this is a very bold statement. Red meat is expensive as we prefer certainty with weight and cooking time. However the truth is two cuts at the same weight, with different distances between the exterior part of the meat and the centre will require different cooking times. As a general rule, the larger the distance between the exterior of the meat and the centre the lower the heat – therefore the longer it takes to cook. This method achieves a restaurant – quality result.

How to test that you have achieved your desired temperature range in the meat (in this case med – rare @ 55 -65 degrees C?

With all this in mind estimated roasting time for a 1.5 -2kg cut, after a good blast of heat (to brown the exterior) will need 1.5 – 2 hours of cooking at approximately 120 degrees C to achieve a med -rare result (55 – 65 degrees C).

Our go-to for simplicity is a good sear to caramelise the outside, and oven cooking at 180 degrees. 20 minutes per 450 g, plus 20 minutes. This keeps it quite rare, add five or ten minutes per section if you wanted medium-rare or medium. Our fail-safe way to test the cook on the roast is using a meat thermometer.

FAQ

How long does it take to cook beef at 180 degrees?

Roast the Perfect Joint To roast a whole joint preheat the oven to 180°C/160° fan/gas 4 and weigh the joint (with any stuffing, if using) in order to calculate the cooking time. Place in the centre of the oven; Rare – cook for 20 minutes per 450g plus 20 minutes. Medium – cook for 25 minutes per 450g plus 25 minutes.

How long does it take to cook a roast at 200 degrees?

Preheat oven to 200°. Place roast on a wire rack set inside a large rimmed baking sheet. Roast until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of meat registers 118°–120° for medium-rare, about 2½ hours.

How long to cook beef roast at 170?

Spread the peeled and cut vegetables in a single layer on the bottom of the roasting pan or on a flat rack inside the pan, then place the roast on top, fat side up. Place in the oven and reduce the temperature to 170 degrees. Cook for 2 1/2 hours per pound (for medium-rare).

Can you slow cook at 180 degrees?

The temperature should be 180 degrees – 200 degrees. If the temperature is higher than 200 degrees, your food may overcook. If the temperature is lower than 180 degrees, you should discard the crock pot since your food will not reach a safe temperature quickly enough.

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