how much protein in 100g beef

When consumed in moderation, beef can improve muscle growth and maintenance. It’s also rich in iron and zinc. But high consumption of beef has been linked to an increased risk for heart disease and cancer.

It is categorized as red meat — a term used for the meat of mammals, which contains higher amounts of iron than chicken or fish.

Usually eaten as roasts, ribs, or steaks, beef is also commonly ground or minced. Patties of ground beef are often used in hamburgers.

Fresh, lean beef is rich in various vitamins and minerals, especially iron and zinc. Therefore, moderate intake of beef can be recommended as part of a healthy diet (1).

Here are the nutrition facts for a 3.5-ounce (100-gram) serving of broiled, ground beef with 10% fat content (2):

The protein content of lean, cooked beef is about 26–27% (2).

Animal protein is usually of high quality, containing all nine essential amino acids needed for the growth and maintenance of your body (3).

As the building blocks of proteins, amino acids are very important from a health perspective. Their composition in proteins varies widely, depending on the dietary source.

Meat is one of the most complete dietary sources of protein, its amino acid profile being almost identical to that of your own muscles.

For this reason, eating meat — or other sources of animal protein — may be of particular benefit after surgery and for recovering athletes. In combination with strength exercise, it also helps maintain and build muscle mass (3).

The amount of fat in beef depends on the level of trimming and the animal’s age, breed, gender, and feed. Processed meat products, such as sausages and salami, tend to be high in fat.

Beef is mainly composed of saturated and monounsaturated fat, present in approximately equal amounts. The major fatty acids are stearic acid, oleic acid, and palmitic acid (3).

Food products from ruminant animals — such as cows and sheep — also harbor trans fats known as ruminant trans fats (5).

The most common is conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), which is found in beef, lamb, and dairy products (5, 6).

CLA has been linked to various health benefits — including weight loss. Still, large doses in supplements may have harmful metabolic consequences (7, 8, 9, 10, 11).

Like plants, meat contains a number of bioactive substances and antioxidants, which may affect health when consumed in adequate amounts.

Beef is a rich source of high-quality protein and various vitamins and minerals. As such, it can be an excellent component of a healthy diet.

It contains all of the essential amino acids and is referred to as a complete protein.

Inadequate protein intake may accelerate age-related muscle wasting, increasing your risk of an adverse condition known as sarcopenia (23).

Sarcopenia is a serious health issue among older adults but can be prevented or reversed with strength exercises and increased protein intake.

The best dietary sources of protein are animal-derived foods, such as meat, fish, and milk products.

In the context of a healthy lifestyle, regular consumption of beef — or other sources of high-quality protein — may help preserve muscle mass, reducing your risk of sarcopenia.

Carnosine is a compound important for muscle function (24, 25).

It’s formed in your body from beta-alanine, a dietary amino acid found in high amounts in fish and meat — including beef.

Supplementing with high doses of beta-alanine for 4–10 weeks has been shown to lead to a 40–80% increase in carnosine levels in muscles (26, 24, 27, 28).

In contrast, following a strict vegetarian diet may lead to lower levels of carnosine in muscles over time (29).

In human muscles, high levels of carnosine have been linked to reduced fatigue and improved performance during exercise (26, 30, 31, 32).

Additionally, controlled studies suggest that beta-alanine supplements can improve running time and strength (33, 34).

Anemia is a common condition, characterized by a decreased number of red blood cells and reduced ability of the blood to carry oxygen.

Iron deficiency is one of the most common causes of anemia. The main symptoms are tiredness and weakness.

Only found in animal-derived foods, heme iron is often very low in vegetarian — and especially vegan — diets (35).

Your body absorbs heme iron much more efficiently than non-heme iron — the type of iron in plant-derived foods (13).

Thus, meat not only contains a highly bioavailable form of iron but also improves the absorption of non-heme iron from plant foods — a mechanism that has not been fully explained and is referred to as the “meat factor.”

A few studies indicate that meat can increase the absorption of non-heme iron even in meals that contain phytic acid, an inhibitor of iron absorption (36, 37, 38).

Another study found that meat supplements were more effective than iron tablets at maintaining iron status in women during a period of exercise (39).

It’s a term for various conditions related to the heart and blood vessels, such as heart attacks, strokes, and high blood pressure.

Some studies detect an increased risk for both unprocessed and processed red meat, a few showed an increased risk for processed meat only, and others reported no significant association at all (40, 41, 42, 43).

Keep in mind that observational studies cannot prove cause and effect. They only show that meat eaters are either more or less likely to get a disease.

It’s possible that meat consumption is just a marker for unhealthy behavior, but negative health effects are not caused by the meat itself.

For example, many health-conscious people avoid red meat because it has been claimed to be unhealthy (44).

Additionally, people who eat meat are more likely to be overweight and less likely to exercise or eat a lot of fruits, vegetables, and fiber (35, 45, 46).

Of course, most observational studies try to correct for these factors, but the accuracy of the statistical adjustments may not always be perfect.

How much protein is in beef?

It depends on the cut, but generally, fresh-cooked lean beef will consist of around 26 – 27g of protein per 100g. Super lean cuts like topside or blade steak will be slightly more protein-rich while cuts with higher fat content, such as scotch fillet or porterhouse, will have slightly less protein.

how much protein in 100g beef

When beef is air-dried, protein content can be boosted to around 60g per 100 grams of beef. This is because the removal of moisture through the drying process results in a higher concentration of protein. So if your gym buddy sees you snacking on some dried meat and asks does beef jerky have protein, or is biltong high in protein—you can tell them they are among the most protein-rich, low fat, low carbohydrate snack foods available.

What are the best sources of protein?

As previously mentioned, meat, eggs and nuts are great sources, along with cheese, chickpeas and greek yoghurt. But of all these sources, red meat is the most protein-rich, and when you consider things like availability, price and our culinary culture here in Australia, beef is the obvious choice of red meat.

Protein is made up of essential amino acids, and because beef has a very similar amino acid profile as ours, it is the best source for human consumption as a complete protein. Other red meats like kangaroo, venison and lamb are also great sources of protein.

For this reason, eating meat — or other sources of animal protein — may be of particular benefit after surgery and for recovering athletes. In combination with strength exercise, it also helps maintain and build muscle mass (3).

Food products from ruminant animals — such as cows and sheep — also harbor trans fats known as ruminant trans fats (5).

The best dietary sources of protein are animal-derived foods, such as meat, fish, and milk products.

Some studies detect an increased risk for both unprocessed and processed red meat, a few showed an increased risk for processed meat only, and others reported no significant association at all (40, 41, 42, 43).

For example, many health-conscious people avoid red meat because it has been claimed to be unhealthy (44).

Amount Per 100 grams

FAQ

How much protein is in 100g of cooked beef?

A 100-gram serving of cooked beef provides 250 calories, 35 grams of protein, and 10 grams of fat (5.2 grams which is healthier monounsaturated fat).

How much protein is in 100 grams of steak?

It depends on the cut, but generally, fresh-cooked lean beef will consist of around 26 – 27g of protein per 100g. Super lean cuts like topside or blade steak will be slightly more protein-rich while cuts with higher fat content, such as scotch fillet or porterhouse, will have slightly less protein.

Which food has most protein per 100g?

1: Chicken Boneless and skinless chicken breast is one of the common and best sources of protein. Bodybuilders and athletes usually include chicken breast in their diet because it does not have saturated fat. Chicken breast contains 31 grams of protein per 100 grams.

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