how much red wine in beef stew

Beef Stew with Red Wine is a delicious and savory beef stew that is made with an entire 750 ml bottle of red wine, stew meat, and hearty vegetables. This makes an amazing dinner when served with warm crusty bread. This can be made on the stove top or in your Instant Pot/Electric Pressure Cooker!

This classic French beef stew is the ultimate cold weather comfort food. After a few hours in the oven, the meat becomes meltingly tender and enveloped in a rich wine sauce.

With over 4,000 5-star reviews, this classic French beef stew is the all-time most popular recipe on my website. It is the ultimate cold weather comfort food. Chunks of well-marbled beef are seared in a hot pan, then gently braised with garlic and onions in a rich wine-based broth. After a few hours in the oven, the meat becomes meltingly tender and enveloped in a deeply flavorful sauce. It takes a few hours to make, but the recipe is mostly hands-off. Go ahead and make it a day or two ahead of time; the flavor improves the longer it sits.

Red wine in French beef stew:

Why add red wine to beef stew?

When you slow-cook tough cuts of meat like beef chuck, the acid present in the wine eventually helps to break the meat down, making it more tender.

Red wine in beef stew also adds depth of flavor — some of the liquid evaporates in the oven, which concentrates the flavors going on in the pot.

So, which red wine should you use? If you’re a regular red wine drinker, a good rule of thumb is to cook with wine that you already love to drink.

You don’t need to spend big bucks on a bottle of wine for beef stew. There are lots of affordable, tasty dry red wines that are both delicious to drink and cook with.

  • Bordeaux-style Cabernet Sauvignon/Merlot blends
  • California Pinot Noir, Syrah, Zinfandel
  • French Cotes du Rhone, Bourgogne (pinot noir), Syrah
  • Italian Chianti, Barbera D’Asti, Montepulciano
  • South American/Australian Malbec, Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon

The best beef cuts for cooking beef stew:

When you shop for meat for beef stew, I recommend avoiding the shrink-wrapped packages of meat labeled “stew meat”.

The meat in those is often a mixture of trimmings from a variety of beef cuts, which means they vary widely in fat content and tenderness.

  • Beef chuck: Boneless chuck is my top choice for beef stew. The chuck comes from the shoulder portion of the cow between the ribs and the brisket.
  • Use a chuck roast to make beef stew
  • Trim off excess fat and cut into large chunks

This heavily exercised muscle contains a lot of connective tissue and fat marbling, which makes for a tastier piece of meat.

Look for chuck roasts labeled blade roast, chuck shoulder, top chuck or shoulder clod roast. If you don’t want to bother cutting up the meat yourself, ask the staff behind the meat department to do it for you.

  • Sear the beef, then cook the shallot in the fat
  • Add the beef back to the pot with red wine, broth and herbs

It’s not traditional, but I prefer to cook the vegetables separately from the stew. It’s a tip I learned when I worked in restaurants. The method is a great way to keep the vibrant color, texture and flavor intact.

  • Celery, fennel, leeks and carrots
  • Cook the vegetables then add to the stew

I like to use a fresh fennel bulb in place of celery for a little Provencal twist, along with the traditional celery. You can use more celery instead of the fennel (3-4 stalks total).

It’s probably not the way your mom or grandmother made stew, but I think it’s an improvement. The veggies in my mom’s stew were boiled to a gray mush — not very appetizing to a kid like me!

how much red wine in beef stew

A Dutch oven is the best slow-cooker!

Along with the pasta pots and cast iron skillets, my enameled cast iron French ovens are my most cherished kitchen tools.

I know some of you are thinking – hasn’t this girl ever heard of a Crock-Pot?! I l-o-v-e my pressure cooker and slow cookers, and I have so many great recipes for them.

how much red wine in beef stew

It just that there’s something special about a an old-fashioned braised beef stew that cooks for hours in the oven.

  • A good enameled cast iron pot is an investment, but it’s beautiful and will last a long, long time.
  • It’s heavy-duty and reliably retains even heat distribution over long, slow cooking times.
  • For slow-cooker recipes, a Dutch oven is a true one-pot vessel — sear meats and sauté vegetables on top of the stove, and place in the oven to slow-cook.
  • You can cook dinner in the oven while doing other things. Nothing is cozier than a warm kitchen in the cooler months.

Beef Stew with Red Wine is a delicious and savory beef stew that is made with an entire 750 ml bottle of red wine, stew meat, and hearty vegetables. This makes an amazing dinner when served with warm crusty bread. This can be made on the stove top or in your Instant Pot/Electric Pressure Cooker!

FAQ

Can you put too much red wine in stew?

Remember, if the red wine is not sufficient for the meat you have prepared, you can add water. Do not use too much red wine or the meat may start to blacken.

Is red wine good in beef stew?

Red wine in beef stew also adds depth of flavor — some of the liquid evaporates in the oven, which concentrates the flavors going on in the pot. So, which red wine should you use? If you’re a regular red wine drinker, a good rule of thumb is to cook with wine that you already love to drink.

How do you get the red wine taste out of beef stew?

I’d start by removing as much liquid as possible, by straining the stew. Then replacing it with stock or water, perhaps with some grape or apple juice mixed in, and probably a little tomato puree/paste.

Can you substitute red wine vinegar for red wine in beef stew?

The Best Substitute for Red Wine Alcohol-free red wine. Beef broth. Chicken broth. Red wine vinegar (use ½ vinegar and ½ water for similar flavor results)

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