how long should corned beef rest

For optimal tenderness Cook the Corned Beef Brisket until it reaches an internal temperature of 203°F, then remove it from the smoker. Place the smoked corned beef on a cutting board, cover with foil, and let it rest for 20 minutes.

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  • Margaret Rose “I love the tips on corned beef, my favorite! The fat and the slicing always aggravated me, now after seeing the videos it was a breeze and now I will cook this often! “…” more

Things You’ll Need

  • Corned beef brisket
  • Aluminum foil
  • Carving knife
  • Meat fork
  • Cutting board

Slicing the Beef

  • 1 Flip the beef over and find its grain pattern. Place the fat side down if you left any on the exterior portion of the corned beef. Look closely to see which way the muscle fibers are oriented in the beef. They look like parallel lines along its entire length.[5]
    • Flat and point portions have different grain patterns, so always cut them separately.
    • The grain is not the same as grill marks. If you cooked the beef on a grill, ignore the grill marks and look for the lines formed by the muscle fibers inside the meat.
  • 2 Turn the meat so you are able to cut across the grain. Your knife needs to run perpendicular to the grain, not parallel to it. That way, you shorten the muscle fibers, making the corned beef much more tender. Long muscle fibers are strong and hard to chew.[6]
    • Briskets have long, tough muscle fibers because they come from a weight-bearing part of the cow. Not cutting against the grain potentially ruins good corned beef.
  • 3 Cut from the corner of the leaner end of the meat. The smaller, leaner portion is easier to cut. Hold the corned beef in place with a meat fork, then work your carving knife down into the meat. To cut through cleanly, move your knife back and forth, almost like you’re operating a saw. By doing this, you alternate bringing the knife’s tip and opposite end in contact with the meat.[7]
    • Push the knife downward as you cut through the meat, gently shaving it into slices.
    • To make a big piece of beef more manageable, cut it in half. As long as you cut it vertically across the grain, reducing its size before slicing it is safe.
  • 4 Slice the rest of the brisket as thinly as possible against the grain. Slice the corned beef about 1⁄8 in (0.32 cm) thick, if possible. The thinner you are able to slice the beef, the easier it will be to chew. Continue cutting across the grain, slicing the beef into roughly equal portions until you reach its other end.[8]
    • Thicker cuts require more chewing but are still fine to use. Some people even prefer their beef that way. Thicker cuts also serve great in recipes such as corned beef hash.
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    5 Store leftover beef in the refrigerator for up to 4 days. To keep the beef safe to eat

    freezer-safe container. Freezing it will maintain its quality for up to 3 months.

  • Spoiled corned beef looks slimy and has an unpleasant

    move it into the refrigerator within 2 hours of cooking it. Place it in resealable plastic bags or containers

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