does arby’s really use wagyu beef

Are Arby’s Wagyu Burgers fake? Unfortunately, there’s no easy answer. The truth is that it does contain Wagyu and is most definitely labeled legally.

If you missed Arby’s Wagyu Steakhouse Burgers when they sold out earlier this year, you’re in luck.

The fast-food chain recently reintroduced the Steakhouse line, which sell in two varieties – Deluxe and Bacon-Ranch. I stuck to the basics and ordered a Deluxe, figuring it’s the best way to judge the meat.

The burgers, made from a blend of 51% American Wagyu and 49% ground beef, are cooked sous-vide style and finished with a quick flash fry. Arby’s restaurants don’t have grills, so the sous-vide cooking technique, which locks in flavor and moisture, is a good alternative.

My sandwich looked picture-perfect. A substantial 6.4 ounce patty was nestled on a toasted, buttery brioche bun with shredded lettuce, sliced tomato, American cheese, red onion, pickles and sauce. The Deluxe burger is priced at about $6.99.

At first bite, it tasted better than an average fast-food burger, but it honestly didn’t blow me away. The shredded lettuce is a bit messy and I feel a burger on the level of Wagyu deserves a lettuce leaf. The sauce is standard much like a Thousand Island dressing.

As a side note, the soft, squishy brioche bun is the perfect accompaniment. The beef patty was tender, but certainly not pink in the middle as advertised.

Because the burgers promote a Wagyu beef offering, I think customers expect top-of-the-line, upscale sandwiches, much like a steakhouse. For those who don’t know, Japanese Wagyu beef is desired for its flavor, tenderness and marbling.

Overall, I liked the burger and Arby’s deserves kudos for taking a risk by branching out with burgers. But honestly, I’m in no rush to return for another one.

“I ate it so you don’t have to” is a regular food column looking at off-beat eats, both good and bad. It runs every other Thursday-ish at noon-ish.

It came well-adorned with lettuce, tomato, onion, pickles and a nice mayo-based burger sauce. It also came on a delightfully chewy bun, which Arby’s claims is brioche. Whatever. It’s an OK burger bun, Arby’s. Chill out for a sec.

Arby’s markets this burger as “a blend of 52% American Wagyu and 48% ground beef.” Wait, what’s up with the second half? It’s just ground beef? Not “100% certified Angus” or whatever marketing nonsense?

This burger patty wasn’t particularly fatty or juicy. The beef actually tasted a bit on the lean side. It wasn’t bad. However, I found myself focusing more on the seasoning than the flavor of the meat itself.

I honestly got more flavor from the burger seasoning than the beef itself. That’s normally fine in a fast-food burger. It’s just perplexing that Arby’s does so much to market the “wagyu” angle without it paying off in any noticeable way.

If you missed Arby’s Wagyu Steakhouse Burgers when they sold out earlier this year, you’re in luck.

Because the burgers promote a Wagyu beef offering, I think customers expect top-of-the-line, upscale sandwiches, much like a steakhouse. For those who don’t know, Japanese Wagyu beef is desired for its flavor, tenderness and marbling.

As a side note, the soft, squishy brioche bun is the perfect accompaniment. The beef patty was tender, but certainly not pink in the middle as advertised.

Overall, I liked the burger and Arby’s deserves kudos for taking a risk by branching out with burgers. But honestly, I’m in no rush to return for another one.

The fast-food chain recently reintroduced the Steakhouse line, which sell in two varieties – Deluxe and Bacon-Ranch. I stuck to the basics and ordered a Deluxe, figuring it’s the best way to judge the meat.

Are Arby’s Wagyu Burgers fake? Unfortunately, there’s no easy answer. The truth is that it does contain Wagyu and is most definitely labeled legally.

FAQ

Is the Arby’s burger real Wagyu?

The burgers, made from a blend of 51% American Wagyu and 49% ground beef, are cooked sous-vide style and finished with a quick flash fry. Arby’s restaurants don’t have grills, so the sous-vide cooking technique, which locks in flavor and moisture, is a good alternative.

Are Wagyu burgers actually Wagyu?

Nan Sato, chief sommelier of Wagyu Sommelier, says, “In reality, you rarely use real wagyu meat in burgers. They mix in the ground fat with other traditionally leaner meat. If you see a wagyu burger on a menu, it’s probably American wagyu or a burger with mostly lean beef [blended with] wagyu fat.”

How does Arby’s cook their new Wagyu burger?

The burger isn’t grilled, broiled or steamed, rather, it’s cooked Sous Vide style, meaning the patty is cooked in a vacuum-sealed pouch and heated slowly at a precise temperature in a water bath. “Boring burgers are a fast-food staple, so Arby’s felt compelled to raise the bar with a Wagyu Steakhouse Burger.

Is there fake Wagyu?

Authentic Wagyu beef comes from a specific breed of cattle raised in Japan and is known for its high level of marbling and rich flavor. However, due to its high demand and premium price, there are counterfeit or mislabeled products in the market that claim to be Wagyu but are not authentic.

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