Sha cha beef is a beef-stir fry full of garlic and ginger flavors. Ready in 10 minutes, this dish will take you to Taiwan with its super savory flavors.

Made with everyday ingredients, this authentic Taiwanese dish is combined with umami-filled shacha sauce. Read on to find out how to get perfectly tender wok-seared beef. If you’re not partial to beef, my sha cha chicken is the perfect flavorful alternative.

What is sha cha sauce

It’s a popular Asian condiment loaded with garlic, ginger, and a touch of dried shrimp seafood flavor. Originating in Fujian, China, it’s a Taiwanese peanut-free version of the Malaysian satay sauce. The sauce gives an instant flavor boost to any dish — stir-fries, soups, and BBQ marinade, and it’s most often used in hot pot sauces.

See my homemade shacha sauce recipe for more information and how to use it in your everyday meals.

what is sha cha beef

what is sha cha beef

A Simple, Tasty Stir-fry That I Definitely Didn’t Make Up

Even I love the stuff and have never used it in a stir-fry. Which is why, when I was brainstorming new recipes to blog, I thought, “how about a sha-cha-based stir-fry?”

As it turns out, I am not the first person to think of this. Surprise surprise.

Sha Cha Beef is indeed a real dish, dating back thousands of years. I’d just never tried it!

My version is pretty simple, featuring beef, scallions, ginger, and two big tablespoons of the good stuff. This Sha Cha Beef stir-fry is super satisfying with steamed white rice and a veggie side, and it only takes minutes to put together.

Here’s how to make it!

Why this will be your favorite beef stir-fry

You’ll find yourself cooking this good-tasting recipe on repeat. Wanna know why sa cha beef is such a popular homemade dish?

  • Flavorful: The savory and umami flavors combo makes it a deeply satisfying meal.
  • Made with simple ingredients: You mainly need beef, scallions, and sha cha sauce.
  • Fast: With sauce at the ready, the dish comes together quickly.

You can easily make shacha beef with pantry ingredients. Here’s everything you’ll need:

  • For the beef: Skirt steak, coconut aminos, fish sauce, toasted sesame oil, black pepper, baking soda, and starch.
  • Aromatics: Garlic, ginger, bulb scallions, dried red chili peppers, avocado oil, coarse sea salt.
  • Sauce: Sa cha sauce and coconut aminos.
  • Use different cuts of beef: You can also use flank steak, hanger steak, or sirloin instead of skirt steak.
  • Change the protein: Besides chicken or beef, swap the protein with other meat to make sa cha pork or prawn.
  • Want to use a different sauce? Use store-bought Chinese bbq sauce or XO sauce.
  • Prefer soy sauce over coconut aminos? You can use organic soy sauce but make sure to balance the sodium with a touch of sugar.

Rating 5.0 (6) · 16 minApr 21, 2018 · Ingredients · 1 pound beef (450g, thinly sliced against the grain; can use flank steak or sirloin) · 1 teaspoon soy sauce (plus 1 tablespoon)

FAQ

What does Sha Cha beef taste like?

Q1: What does sha cha beef taste like? A: Garlicky, gingery, deeply savory, and umami flavor, combined with thinly sliced beef stir-fried in a hot wok. Q2: What is sa cha made of? A: It’s made of super savory ingredients like garlic, shallots, ginger, and dried shrimp powder.

What is Sha Cha flavor?

Shacha Sauce (shāchá jiàng, 沙茶酱) is a Chinese condiment made from oil, garlic, shallots, chilies, and seafood (usually brill fish and dried shrimp). It has an intensely savory, mildly seafood-y flavor.

What is a substitute for sha cha sauce?

Substitutions for sha cha sauce While there isn’t one perfect substitute for sa cha sauce, the closest thing you can get is XO sauce. If you like your sauce extra spicy, a great alternative is my chili garlic sauce, which is super flavorful, extra garlicky, and has a spicy taste.

What is shacha in Chinese?

Shacha sauce (Chinese: 沙茶; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: sa-te; also spelled sa cha sauce) is a savory, slightly spicy Chinese condiment used in Min Nan cuisine (primarily Teochew, Fujian, and Taiwanese). It is made from soybean oil, garlic, shallots, chilies, Chinese brill, and dried shrimp.

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